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Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: No. IL
E-mail: Contact
Marshall, thanks for your reply, and let me add that you are still carrying on. It's ironic, but because of the .410 revolvers esp. loaded with " buck" that there are many new loads being released . I still run into non gun enthusiasts who happen to have cheap bolt and single shot 410.s that they haven't shot since the 50' or 60's but stiller determined to hold on to them. Many seem to think of them as in the same class as BB guns.


Admin reply: I agree that the revolvers in .45/.410 have had a terrific impact on the .410 bore shotgun shells which had been totally static since about 1970. The addition of buckshot loads changed the complexion of .410s for shot guns as well. There are a couple of "ALOOF, etc." items which address this: "The .410 for Self Defense"; “Winchester 2005 Loads ” the first 3 inch 000 buckshot; the Taurus Judge; and Single Shot Derringers.

As I mention in several places, my first shotgun was a bolt action Mossberg, but it was a three shot repeater. Like you, I have been surprised a number of times when seemingly non-shooters, some even anti-gunners, mention having an old bolt action .410. As you note, they seem to regard it as innocuous. I once car pooled with a gent who was Liberal Left and generally anti-gun. One day he astonished me by mentioning that had owned a bolt action .410 since he was a teen. I think this speaks to a larger truth, guns are innocuous in the hands of honest and decent people.

 
Added: January 24, 2016 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Marshall Williams
From: Burlington, WV
E-mail: Contact
It occurs to me that I ought to say something about the .410 website. It remains a very good and very useful source of information on all things .410 and is still actively monitored. Webmeister Phil has had eye problems which interfere with him work on the main pages, and I am IT incompetent so can't assist him. However, I monitor and respond to as many messages as my IT incompetence allows. For ALOOF, Marshall
 
Added: January 23, 2016 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Northern Illinois USA
E-mail: Contact
Hello to all UK and USA .410 advocates. Thought I'd mention that for the the last several weeks I've carried Savage 311 double number 7 as described years ago as a 1950's 30% condition gun with barrels cut at 20 inches with me while cutting several cords of hickory and barrack firewood from my uncles woods, which has several blowdown trees from previous storms. I'm shooting 2 1/2 inch shells with 13 grains of 2400 powder and half an ounce of # 8 shot reloaded on a Mec 600 jr. press. These cost me less than 6 cents each and when I'm bored with splitting wood I shoot at the cross sections at 18 to 30 yards. I'm amazed at the little Savage's ability to put a lethal load of shot in at those ranges. Lately on gun broker I've seen several Savage fox models in the $800 dollar range . I haven't any interest in serious hunting so I'll stay out of the bidding. FYI the Fox model was really a 311 Stevens/Savage with better finish, nicer walnut and one or two triggers depending on model. Actually the singele trigger fox usually go for over $1000 which is a bit rich for stump shooting. Enjoy the outdoors!! S Hill

Admin reply: I like both your little Stevens shotgun as well as the use you put it to. Reminds me of the fine little “pocket shotguns” popular in the US before the Gun Control Act of 1934 essentially ended the useful design. They were small enough and light enough to carry along when you were working in the woods, but useful for small game hunting. And bigger game with slugs or, now, the commonly available .410 buckshot loads. (Several of these are outlined in the ALOOF etc. section. See menu on main page.} I am as astonished as you at the prices asked for these once inexpensive, “bottom of the line up” guns. Stoeger offers a .410 bore Coach Gun with 20 inch barrels at a lot more reasonable price. .410. Both barrels are full choke, but that can be remedied.
 
Added: January 22, 2016 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Northern Illinois USA
Dave, thanks for sharing. The Rossi with hammers sounds like a nice gun. After you tried threading for screw in chokes, did you cut the barrel threads off? 45 years ago I acquired a bolt action Mossberg .410, model 183 that had an adjustable choke that was bent at 45 degrees. Since I only paid $10 for it, I cut the device off and it still had a nice even pattern at 18 to twenty yards. In addition it made the gun very easy to maneuver in brush with. I sold it for $20 but wish I had kept it. Please tell us more.

Admin reply: To Dave and Steve. Interesting comments. If you look at the ALOOF etc. entry titled "The Maligned .410," you will see that my first shotgun bought in 1955, was a .410 Mossberg 183K with the little choke tubes and funny "spanner." It was a great gun for the money, and I used it to learn to shoot skeet.
The Beretta folding shotgun on which the Falco is based has a long and interesting history. Introduced in 1925, it remained in the line until 1992. At different times, it was made in all gauges from 9mm RF to 8 gauge(!!!), and from 1969 - 1973, formed the basis for a very good, if slightly eccentric, single barrel trap gun. Thanks for the entries.

 
Added: October 10, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Dave Orchard
From: Inland NW/Wash. state, USA
E-mail: Contact
After and abject failure of threading a Rossis SxS hamergun for choke-tubes, and the complete unavailability of FALCO shotguns here in the USA, I ran across a Yildiz TK-36 folding single-shot w/28"/71cm barrel.
TK-36 single-shot is very reasonably priced :-)

It is built just like the fine old Beretta model 412's, only with a smaller frame of aircraft aluminum and has a cammed extractor(no ejector), fixed choke (a tight modified?) and a well-polished bore.
When I have misjudged the range I have still succeeded in killing a bit past 30 yds. range.(Measured by LRF after-the-fact ;-)

Academy Sports has the sole sales of them here.
I had to get someone near to an Academy store to get one for me and transfer/ship it to where I could receive it.

Stock wood looks like walnut and is a good fit with slight cast-off for R.handed shooter.
The long barrel is very thin so the balance is butt-heavy...
I cured that by poacher-stocking the gun with a triangular hole to skeletonize the buttstock.
Doing so cut the wt. by 1/4 lb. to 3 lb.s even.
It is a dream to carry, and sicne my eyes are giving me a bit of trouble (age/cataracts) I am no longer quick enough with a rifle for smallgame.
.410 & 28 ga. are the only viable means of small game hunting for me currently.

Hope this helps someone else find a light smoothbore suited to their needs :-)

Davo

Admin reply: To Dave and Steve. Interesting comments. If you look at the ALOOF etc. entry titled "The Maligned .410," you will see that my first shotgun bought in 1955, was a .410 Mossberg 183K with the little choke tubes and funny "spanner." It was a great gun for the money, and I used it to learn to shoot skeet.
The Beretta folding shotgun on which the Falco is based has a long and interesting history. Introduced in 1925, it remained in the line until 1992. At different times, it was made in all gauges from 9mm RF to 8 gauge(!!!), and from 1969 - 1973, formed the basis for a very good, if slightly eccentric, single barrel trap gun. Thanks for the entries.

 
Added: October 5, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: George Childs
From: Ontario Canada
E-mail: Contact
Hi there...I recently inherited an old double barrel Smith Midgley shotgun and would love to know more about it...number on trigger guard is 5201...anf info appreciated

Admin reply: I was unacquainted with Smith-Midgley, so I did a google search for the term "Smith Midgley guns" and turned up bits and pieces of information as well as a section of photographs. It appears that Smith Midgley was a clock maker and gun smith and the firm was in business over rather a long period, 1801 to possibly as late as ca. 1930s. Guns pictured include a wide variety ranging from hammer guns and plain box locks to very handsome sidelock game guns of obvious high quality. The firm was located in Sunbridge Road in Bradford, Yorkshire from 1897 to 1901. Guns appear to have been made in Birmingham and do not command the high prices that London guns do.
 
Added: May 31, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Paul Minost
From: UK
E-mail: Contact
This .360 question got me rummaging round in my odds and ends box where I found an 8.15x46R case, which would also seem to be a simpler possibility for reloading. Both the .360 shotgun and the 8.15x46R are on the "obsolete" list of cartridges in Britain, but I found that Custom Brass and Bullets, Grafs and Lohman Arms list 8.15x46R brass for sale. All in the US, so probably not much help to us over here. Henry Krank in the UK offer a .30-30 x3-1/4 BASIC case (no taper, no neck) This would appear to be perfect but at £2.35 EACH !! Again, maybe Marshall could comment on the possibility (if any!) of getting brass from the US.

Admin reply: I do not know much about exporting empty unprimed cartridge brass. Best bet to find out is locate the required brass at one of the major distributors and inquire of them. www.midwayusa.com comes to mind, but there are numerous others. I will take a look later and see whether I can find anything. Several US suppliers specialize in obsolete brass. I will see what turns up.
 
Added: April 20, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Paul Minost
From: UK
E-mail: Contact
In reply to Robin's query about .360 cartridges, I have searched high and low without success. The only ones I have seen have been in collections. I understand that Eley stopped manufacturing them during the last war to save resources and never started again when the war was over. Maybe somewhere an antique cartridge dealer might have some, but at what price !! Marshall's suggestion about using .30-30 cases would involve a bit of simple machining on the lathe and then fire forming, but it is probably the only way.

Admin reply: Hi and thanks for the post. Marshall
 
Added: April 19, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Robin Johnson
From: UK
E-mail: Contact
Im looking for some .360 1 3/4" cartridges. Does anyone know where I can get some

Admin reply: I can offer no help on proper cases, in fact I was unfamiliar with the cartridge, and had to look it up in Barnes "Cartridges of the World." After reviewing the case dimensions, it appears to me that a dedicated reloader could easily form brass cases from .30-30 cases. I would be interested in knowing a little about your gun, the use you put it to, and who made the last cartridges you had. Marshall Williams
 
Added: March 27, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: S.Hill
From: N. Illinois
E-mail: Contact
.410 # 8 (the last) this is out of order because I like number 8, better than 7! Also I made a kind of bar d trade on this one. I happened to have had a Win 37 .410 that was nr mt. that I had bought at a rummage sale for $90 ! However I didn't like it. It was heavier than the 311 no matter what the books show and it had a small hairline crack in the butt stock. I had it with me to trade at a gun shop 50 miles away. when I walked in, I saw a scruffy 311 H series stevens and I asked the owner what it was as if I'd never seen one. He said he'd just gotten it in and didn't know what he'd ask. He also played dumb with my Winchester 37 and said he'd have trouble selling it - a big lie- He gave me the Stevens 311 ser. # c3394xx and $50 boot for the Winchester (he hadn't noticed the crack) and really it was no big deal. I quickly signed the papers and headed out the door.That was in 2004 and I haven't added a .410 to my group since then. Now 311's sell for $600 plus and I haven't seen a good deal in 11 years!
For the record, if I didn't have a good .410 and wanted one, I wouldn't hesitate to pay $600 for a solid 311 Stevens! They've been very good to me!! Thanks for reading this....

Admin reply: Aha, Finally you reveal yourself to be a horse trader. (What gun collector isn't?) I tend to agree with you. One would be hard pressed to find a good .410 double for any less. Thanks for regaling us with stories of your collection. Sorry to see the end of the line. Good luck and best wishes on future acquisitions. Marshall Williams
 
Added: March 5, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  

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