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Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL
E-mail: Contact
Don't mean to hijack this site, but I'll go on with my history if no one minds...... next 410 is a Stevens Savage 59a bolt action with a 5 shot tube feed. My 59 has a walnut stock with 3 inches at the front of the fore end painted black which they did with many of their cheaper guns from 1934 until the early 50's. My best hunting friend in high school hunted pheasants with a 59 and although it was a repeater it frequently jammed on repeat shots - I was not impressed. The one I bought in 1995 worked fairly smoothly. I had bought a Mec 600 JR reloading set up which resized the shells and with which I could reload 2 1/2 inch shells for 7 cents each so I shot clay birds extensively. ( I still lived in the country) I also experimented with large buckshot reloading .32 balls 4 in a row in 3 inch shells. For three years I carried the 59 in a gun case stashed behind the seat of my Chevrolet pickup. I didn't hunt with it, but carried it for occasional plinking at cans etc. (one of the pleasures of rural USA living) I will add that I was in my 40s at that time and my reloads were cheap. As a young boy I could not have afforded my profligate popping off of shells. For the next 10 years I shot the 59 200 -300 times per year at inanimate still targets. It's still in good shape and if I could only have one 410, that would be the one. Also reloading the 410 is much more expensive than it was 30 years ago. Finding empty cases is difficult now.

Admin reply: I started with a Mossberg bolt action .410 and learned to shoot skeet with it. And evenrything else until I could afford another shotgun.
 
Added: February 10, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL
E-mail: Contact
My next of 8 Stevens 410s was purchased in 1992. It was a Savage 24 B over -under with a .22 LR on top and .410 on the bottom. I paid $130 for it and it was in 99% condition. In fact it was very stiff to open up. It had a very nice walnut stock and shot a very tight 85% pattern at 25 yards with 7 1/2 shot. It was heavier than the double .410 Because it was in such good condition I fired less than 50 rounds combined with it. It shot good groups with all .22 ammunition bet hit about 2 inches to the left. I decided not to adjust the rear sight because you have to drift it with a brass punch and I didn't want to hurt its collector value. This model had a round metal button that you raised or lowered to control which barrel you hoped to fire.

Admin reply: Arguably the world's most useful gun. The button selector on old ones can be a problem. The little detent fails and you can shoot only one barrel. The fix is easy, IF you can find a hammer with the selector on the hammer spur. It is a simple parts swap. Leaves you with a hole where the detent was. I usually covered the hole with a small oval of brass glued over the hole.
 
Added: February 9, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL 61021 USA
E-mail: Contact
To sart out, let me say I was born on a corn/hay/angus cattle/ Chester White hog farm in 1951. My dad had a few guns, including an 1897 winchester 12 gauge. He had no use for the .410 and when I was 10 I was given a model 37 winchester single shot in 20 gauge with a "mod" choke. I didn't own a .410 until 1985, when I bought a used Stevens 311 a double barrel. It had 26 inch barrels and 3" chambers. All my 410s are 3 inch since they were made after 1950.My first had a beautiful walnut stock and was made in Chickopee Falls MA. It showed very little use with 98% blue and all original varnish. Both barrels however had slight bulges, maybe 4 mm but they patterned well with # 6, 71/2 and 8 shot. I paid $150 which was a fair price around here.
In the midwest farm areas, the .410 is very popular and sells at a good premium, even though shells are 3 times the price of 12 and 20 gauge. Hope you're not bored by this - more later.

Admin reply: Thanks for your information, it will be interesting to many viewers. Since I am older than dirt, I would point out that when your little double was made, the 2 1/2 inch .410 shells (cartridges) cost noticeably less than 20 gauge shells, and even the three inch shells cost slightly less, so there was a slight economy in a .410, and they were useful for dealing with barnyard pests and for hunting small game, especially rabbits and squirrels.
 
Added: February 7, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Steven Hill
From: Dixon IL 61021 USA
E-mail: Contact
Been watching and reading this site since around 2004 I think. Enjoy it as much asI love my " 8 Stevens .410s " Finally decided it was time to get on board!

Admin reply: Eight sounds like a serious collection. Perhaps you would like to describe them, tell us the chamber lengths, describe their markings, and maybe date them. That could be helpful for other visitors.
 
Added: February 2, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Marshall Williams
From: Burlington, WV
E-mail: Contact
In 2015, I resolve to read comments at least once a week and to answer as many as I can.
 
Added: January 11, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: JIM MORRISON
From: USA
E-mail: Contact
I HAVE A STEVENS .410/12MM MARKED ON BARREL SINGLE SHOT THAT WAS HANDED DOWN FROM MY GRANDFATHER. I WISH TO PRESENT THIS HISTORICAL ITEM TO MY SON OF THE 4TH GENERATION. I HAVE HAD A ROUGH TIME DETERMINING ITS DATE OF MAUFACTURE AND ACCEPTABLE CURRENT AMMO. ANY ASSISTANCE WOULD BE APPRECIATED. THANK YOU

Admin reply: Oops. I originally read this while talking on the phone about unrelated matters and somehow convinced myself that your inquiry was about two inch .410s/44.

Although the .410 was in use much earlier in France and England, Peters made the first US .410s in about 1911. They were just two inches long and the boxes bore both .410 and 12 mm designations.

Twelve millimeters 12mm is the more common European designation for the cartridge and relates to the case diameter, not bore diameter. The .410 case is about .470 inches or 12 mm in diameter while the .410 bore obviously is .410 inches or about 10.4mm.

The "410/12mm" is simply an early way to designate the .410 shotgun. When it appears on an American gun, it usually indicates that the gun was a model that was intended to be sold abroad as well as in the US. It also indicates that the chamber is shorter than three inches and may be only two inches instead of the more common 2 1/2 inch chamber. If the chamber is shorter than 2 1/2 inches, the gun probably was made before 1921 when the 2 1/2 inch chamber was introduced and almost instantly replaced the two inch chamber.

The 12mm designation disappeared from US-made guns fairly early except models made for export sales. My 1940 Shooters Bible lists Stevens models only as ".410s," as did all other makers except Harrington & Richardson. H&R offered some models in 12mm (.410) 14mm (32 ga), and 18mm (24 gauge). As the latter two gauges are not only designated by metric caliber and all but unknown in America, these guns likely were intended for export.

Hope this helps.

For ALOOFinc*
Marshall Williams
*incorrigible

 
Added: January 5, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Tim Woodhouse
From: Book details
To all that have been asking re the .410 book
it can be ordered from the ad on the home page of the .410 site from folkstone Engineering who will ship it absolutely anywhere that is required.
I'm sorry about the confusion re this but I've not been too well for a long while which is why I've not been posting on the site etc.
I am now back in action so to speak so hopefully things will get back to some semblance of normality (whatever that is!).
I would like to wish all .410 shotgunners and everyone else who checks out the site a happy new year.
Tim Woodhouse
 
Added: January 5, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Tim Stewart
From: Florida
E-mail: Contact
Hi Harry, Sorry to disappoint, no book deals from me. Nuttin' to sell, and no SPAM-a-rama-ding-dong. Shoot straight, aim well,

Best,

Tim
 
Added: January 4, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: harry harring
From: wiltshire uk
E-mail: Contact
Dear Tim, which christmas will you be doing special deals on your book?
 
Added: January 3, 2015 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  
Submitted by Comments:
Name: Tim Stewart
From: Florida USA
E-mail: Contact
By Jove, is this site showing signs of activity? I hope so, as we're starved for news on this side of the pond.

Reloaders here are suffering from a strangle hold on smokeless powder distribution including the very difficult to find ones for the .410. Santa did not drop any down my chimney, but has promised a return visit soon.

Best to all .410 shooters everywhere!
 
Added: December 26, 2014 Delete this entry  Reply to entry  View IP address  

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